ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 21  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 37-41

Attitude, perception, acceptance, and life after amputation as seen in Lagos University Teaching Hospital


1 Department of Surgery, College of Medicine University of Lagos; Department of Orthopaedic/Trauma, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria
2 Department of Orthopaedic/Trauma, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. George O Enweluzo
Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Lagos/Department of Orthopaedic/Trauma, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos
Nigeria
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jomt.jomt_5_19

Rights and Permissions

Background: Amputation is a surgical ablation of a limb as a form of treatment. A survey of the attitude, perception, and acceptance of amputation was carried out to determine the level of knowledge and understanding of the indications and benefits, among adult patients and relatives at the Orthopaedic and Trauma Clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital. This study also involved survey among amputees to determine prospects of life after amputation. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study in which structured questionnaires were administered to adult patients and relatives at the Orthopaedic and Trauma Clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital from May 2017 to November 2018. A second questionnaire was administered to few amputees and the data obtained from the study was analyzed using SPSS. Results: A total of 332 respondents were interviewed. The mean age was 43 ± 19.4 years. There were 194 (58.4%) males and 138 (41.6%) females. Two hundred ninety-nine respondents (90%) had knowledge of amputation as a treatment method whereas 21 (6.3%) had no knowledge. Two hundred twenty-six respondents (68%) were aware of the importance of prosthesis. Seven (17.9%) were able to return to their initial work whereas eight (20.5%) were able to secure work other than their initial work. Conclusion: Majority of the respondents had good knowledge of amputation as well as the indications for amputation. Few of the amputees interviewed were able to return to their preamputation work; therefore, there is the need for improved social support, better rehabilitation, and occupational therapy in developing countries.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed416    
    Printed36    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded46    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal